1178 Broadway -- Burlingame, California 94010
Telephone 650-343-0182



HOURS:
Monday 9-7 Tuesday-Saturday 9-7:30
Closed Sundays.




Inquire About A Wine--Gerald at Weimax.com


Please check our Home-Page for Shipping Info.


Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Sporadic Emails

For Email Marketing you can trust

 

SUSSUDIO ???

FLORAL ALBARIÑO

SARDINIAN WHITE

BOONTLING PINOT

NEW SONOMA RHONE-ISTE OF NOTE

REMARKABLE PINOT

LAKE COUNTY ZIN

STELLAR NEW ARTISAN RIOJA

OSTATU BLANCO

GREAT GRUNER VELTLITER $13.99

NICE LITTLE PINOT $9.99

STONY RIESLING

BLAYE ME!
$14.99

NEW MADIRAN
$14.99

DRY MUSCAT
FROM AOSTA

I'M OKAY
YOUR RUCHE

"TEXTBOOK" CHARDONNAY

RIOJA BARGAIN

PRETTY PETTY SARAH

FORAGING FOR PINOT NOIR

MARSELAN...A HYBRID OF CABERNET & GRENACHE

CLASSIC MACON $13.99

CRISP MOUNTAIN WHITE

BEST BUYS
Good Wines for $5-$15

CASTELÃO BARGAIN

STELLAR BLAUFRÄNKISCH ESTATE

CAMPANIAN DELIGHTS

COLORFUL ZIN

23 TO BUY 25 REASONS

FIE, FY, FO, FUM

ROMORANTIN

DOURO DYNAMITE

PORTUGUESE RED BARGAIN

BARGAIN ZWEIGELT

GRAND SYRAH FROM AN UNUSUAL PLACE

SERIOUSLY FINE KIWI SAUVIGNON BLANC
$21.99

SPICY AGLIANICO

WHITE BURGUNDIES OF NOTE

MARSANNE BARGAIN

CHERRYISH TUSCAN RED SALE $10.99

2013 TAVEL ROSE

DRY NEW YORK RIESLING

PROSECCO FOR ADULTS

UNUSUAL ROSSO FROM THE COLLINE NOVARESI

BILLIONAIRE'S WINES UNDER $30!

BARGAIN WHITE BORDEAUX

PIERCINGLY GOOD
WHITE

TOP OF THE LINE
CREMANT

ANOTHER RULLY GOOD WHITE

UNIQUE BUBBLY DESSERT WINE

RESERVE QUALITY RIOJA

LA INA SHERRY

BARBERA OF NOTE

LETTUCE SHOW YOU A GOOD PINOT NOIR

NEW, ARTISAN PINOT NOIR

SUPER VERONESE SALE $12.99

PIEMONTE'S GRAND VIN BIANCO?

WHITE BURGUNDY OF NOTE

GAMAY FROM THE FRENCH ALPS

DELICIOUS, FRESH ROSÉS

GREAT GRUNER VELTLINER

GOOD ELEVEN-BUCK CHIANTI

FLOWERY, CURIOUS RED

OLD FAVORITE KIWI SAUVIGNON IS BACK

OLD PATCH RED
ZIN BLEND

MONCUIT'S GRAND CRU CHAMPAGNE

HONEYED MUSCAT

SPICY 
GEWÜRZTRAMINER

Napa Valley Grape Info
2002

2010

Amazing FRENCH CIDERS

FIZZY LAMBRUSCO

 

 

HOME PAGE

AMERICAN WINES

CALIFORNIA PINOT NOIRS

RHONE WANNABEES

ZINFANDELS

SAUVIGNON BLANCS

MERLOTS

OREGON WINES

CALIFORNIA CHARDONNAYS

CALIFORNIA CABERNETS

RIESLING & GEWURZ

WASHINGTON STATE

CANADIAN WINES

Adventuresome  Wines

ROSÉS !!

FRENCH WINES
ALSACE
BEAUJOLAIS
RED BORDEAUX
WHITE BORDEAUX
RED BURGUNDY
WHITE BURGUNDY
RHÔNE VALLEY
THE FRENCH ALPS
SOUTH OF FRANCE

LOIRE


CHAMPAGNE

 

ITALIAN WINES
PIEMONTE

VALLE D'AOSTA

NORTHERN ITALY

CENTRAL ITALIA

TUSCANY

SOUTHERN ITALIA


SPANISH WINES
Spanish Sherry
& Other Delights


PORTUGUESE WINES

SWISS WINES

GERMAN WINES

AUSTRIAN WINES

ARGENTINA

CHILE

AUSTRALIA

NEW ZEALAND

SOUTH AFRICA

OBSCURE WINES

DESSERT WINES

CHAMPAGNES

HALF-BOTTLES

SPIRITS

CIDERS

BEER
Even Real "Bud"!

OTHER STUFF

WINE TASTING

WHAT'S OPEN


UPCOMING TASTINGS

TASTING RESULTS
  
NEWSLETTER

SHIPPING INFO

ETC.

 

TASTING REPORTS

HOW TO ORGANIZE A BLIND-TASTING

BLIND TASTING ARCHIVE

MY 2013 EURO WINE ADVENTURE BOOK

CHATEAU MONTELENA
VERTICAL


ALBA WINES EXHIBITION 2007

ALBA WINES EXHIBITION 2008

SCHRAMSBERG vs THE FAMOUS FRENCH

German Wine "Master Class" Tasting

S & M FOR WINETASTING GEEKS

TEAR-WAH
TASTING

2014 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2013 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2012 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2011 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2010 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2009 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION

2008 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION
Periodically Amazing

2007 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION
The Nose Knows!

2006 SF INTERNATIONAL  WINE COMPETITION.
SPIT HAPPENS

2005 SF INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION.

2004 SF WINE COMPETITION TASTING

The 2003 SF WINE COMPETITION

2002 SF WINE COMPETITION TASTING 

A Vertical Tasting of Nalle Zinfandels

 

ETC.

RANTINGS & RAVINGS

WINE ROADS of EUROPE

Food/Wine/Friends
A Photo Gallery

MASTER OF WINE ESSAY TOPICS

Old Bottles: A TASTE OF HISTORY

Bob's Venetian Diary

Bob's Paris Notes Updated Spring 2007

Wine Writer's Confession

NEW "CULT" WINERY

Some Restaurant Reviews

HOW TO SELL WINE.
Info For Brokers and
Wine Distributors.

HOW TO HOLD A TRADE TASTING

$100,000 WORTH OF WINE MARKETING ADVICE:  FREE!
Mainly for Foreign Vintners

MOLDY CORKS

Study Reveals Experts Taste More Than What's In the Glass!

OKANAGAN VALLEY WINE TOUR-2010

BRIAN'S 2005 SUMMER VACATION WITH UNCLE

Gerald's Tour de France 2006

GERALD'S TOUR DE FRANCE 2008

A TOUR OF PORTUGAL-2009

HOW TO SPEAK BETTER ITALIAN

PONZI'S 40th
ANNIVERSARY

ROOSEVELT'S 2005 CHILI COOK-OFF

ROOSEVELT'S 2007 CHILI COOK-OFF

Grape Goddess

Ross Bruce Birthday

ALESSIA DALL'U

CCIV

FAQs

BURLINGAME

Links

WHITE BURGUNDY

Burgundy is divided into a number of sub-regions and these are important in sorting out this jigsaw puzzle of a viticultural area.

White Burgundies are, typically, Chardonnay wines. There are a few exceptions:
"Aligoté" is a rather simple and acidic dry white, making its most noteworthy wine in the area of Bouzeron.

"Sacy" is responsible for some wines designated "Bourgogne Grand Ordinaire" which come from the Yonne (Chablis) region.
"Sauvignon" (blanc) makes some very nice little wines in the Chablis sub-region of "St-Bris-le-Vineux" and we've, periodically, had some of this steely, dry white here in the shop.

I have seen references to Pinot Blanc and Pinot Chardonnay with respect to Burgundy. There is even a supposedly "mutant" clone of Pinot Noir, said to be first isolated at the domaine of Henri Gouges in Nuits-Saint-Georges.

So, for the most part we're dealing with CHARDONNAY.


Now, you need to know the sub-regions here:

"Chablis," located about 60 miles northwest of the heart of Burgundy. There is a wine known as "Petite Chablis" from small pockets of vineyards scattered around the region. This is usually really simple, acidic, bone dry and very light. "Chablis" can be magnificent wine. The most prestigious are of Grand Cru status and encompass seven "crus": Blanchot, Bougros, Les Clos, Grenouilles, Les Preuses, Valmur and Vaudésir. These can be the most interesting and long-lived wines, going ten or more years. The most common Premier crus include: Beauroy, Fourchaume, Montée de Tonnerre, Montmains and Vaillons.  These often take three to five years to blossom.
Click here for a page with Chablis photos and maps...


"Côte d'Or,"  the heart of Burgundy and where the most prestigious wines come from is divided into two sub-regions: the Côte de Nuits and the Côte de Beaune. It is from the latter area that the most well-known white Burgundies come from. Here you'll find Corton Charlemagne, Meursault, Auxey-Duresses, Saint-Romain, Puligny-Montrachet, Chassagne-Montrachet and Saint-Aubin.
  

 


"Do you know the way to Montrachet?"

"Cote Chalonnaise" makes some good, lighter-weight Chardonnays. These might be found with the appellations of Givry, Mercurey, Rully or Montagny.



"Macon" is the most southerly region of Burgundy and it's most famous wine is Pouilly-Fuissé. There are a number of producers attempting to make oakier, richer white wines here, but, frankly, the wines sold by the large negociant firms are expensive and, to our taste, rather soulless and empty.   Happily some small estates have figured out how to make more interesting and complex wines.  A few of these rival good California Chardonnays and offer an alternative to good Côte de Beaune whites.  Few, though, reach the level of quality of fine Premier Cru or Grand Cru white Burgundy.  On the other hand, the area is loaded with producers of good, simple, straight-forward, non-oaked Chardonnays and these, costing around fourteen bucks, can be pretty satisfying.


White Burgundy Producers We Like:

 


DOMAINE PINSON
The 7th generation of Pinsons is running this family estate right near the 'wash-a-teria' in beautiful downtown Chablis.
 


No kidding...the winery is right along the little creek that flows through town and there's an ancient community clothes-washing place right there in case you're visiting and feel a need to beat the hell out of your laundry.  I didn't notice an automated laundromat in town, by the way.

The Pinson family traces its roots back to the year 1640.  We think their Chablis wines are better than ever, but then we weren't around to assess the wines made in the 1640s.   

The winery was one of the first to bottle its own wines.  They hadn't thought of this in the 1600s and it took them until 1940 to come up with the notion of vinifying wine and selling it in glass containers which customers could transport home.  The property encompassed some 3 hectares back then.  By the 1982 vintage the domaine comprised all of five hectares.  

Laurent and Christophe run the estate today and they care for a whopping 12 hectares of vines.  In 2004 they built a new, modern cellar.  We found a nice installation of temperature-controlled stainless steel fermentation tanks.  This allows them to really capture the fruit and minerality of the various parcels of vines.  

Laurent explained they like to incorporate a small percentage of wood-fermented wine into most lots.  Even the basic Chablis has a small amount of barrel-fermented juice, though the wood is rather neutral.  Laurent explains they like the complexity this adds to the wine.  


Yields are much less today than in their father's day.  The grand cru vines produce about 35 hectoliters per hectare, while the premier cru vines turn out 45 to 48 hectoliters/hectare.  Quality seems to be the name of the game here and we tasted some very fine bottles on our visit.

We had their 2012 basic Chablis in stock.  Here's a lovely example of Chablis at a most affordable price.  I seem to recall that 80% of the wine is from one vineyard in particular.  Only 7% of the wine sees wood, as they strive to retain the character of "Chablis" in the wine.  Moderately stony and quite dry, it's a perfect accompaniment to simple, pan-fried fish filets, a platter of oysters, etc.

Their 1er Cru Montmain is magnificent Chablis.  It comes from vines which are 50+ years of age.  Nice fruit and a whiff of wood.  Complete.  Delicious now and it'll be good for a number of years.

The Grand Cru of Les Clos reaches great heights in this cellar.  Very fine and deep.  It is delicious in its youth and one can see if will continue to develop handsomely for a number of years.

By the way, I understand the Pinson wines cost more than the famous Chablis wines from the Raveneau family at the cellar door.
The Raveneau wines, though, due to their fame and demand, end up commanding insanely higher prices when they reach the consumer.
We are fortunate to have access to the Pinson wines through a reliably good and honest importer here in the area.


Currently in stock:  2012 PINSON "CHABLIS"  SALE $19.99 (750ml)
2011 PINSON "CHABLIS"  $11.99  (375ml)
2012 PINSON CHABLIS 1er Cru "Montmain"  (list $40)  SALE $34.99
2011 PINSON CHABLIS Grand Cru "Les Clos"  $59.99


Chablis Meister, Laurent Pinson


Mr. and Mrs. Pinson

 

 

 

DOMAINE Des COMTES LAFON
It's not fair to "tease" you with a huge write-up of a domaine whose wines are so highly regarded and so scarce that we can't offer you but a bottle from time to time.  

I had the good fortune to visit this small domaine in Meursault in March of 2002.  The property covers some 13.9 hectares, 8 of which are devoted to Chardonnay.  This is one of those domaines run by a perfectionist.  Dominique Lafon took over for his father René some years ago.  "Dad" was a highly regarded wine-grower and Dominique has the same reputation.



It was really great to taste these wines out of barrel (sorry if I'm torturing you), because when I've tasted the wines fresh-off-the-boat I've wondered what all the fuss is about.  Tasting them out of barrel (we tasted very fine 2000s and still-developing and hard-to-assess 2001s), I found the elements about which I've read.  These are deep and profound wines which are refined and elegant.  Dominique Lafon's right hand man, Stéphane Thibodaux told us that the wines are really nice after five or six years in the bottle.  But he said their 1992s, at ten years of age, were still "closed" unless you decant them and let them "breathe" for about an hour!

Ellen visited the estate in February of 2005 and described the wines she tasted as "magical."






Lafon purchased a property in Macon, so we are now able to have a taste of how a Meursault-Maniac handles Macon.  The first vintages have been rather promising, so this will be a project whose progress we will follow with great interest.  (How many Macon producers make great Montrachet?  Only Lafon!)





Macon Milly-Lamartine.  Good wines, though I didn't mistake them for Lafon's Meursault Clos de la Barre.  I am curious to see how these develop with cellaring.  Time will tell.

Post-script: I recently had a chance to taste some "older" bottles of Lafon's Macon wines.  Wow...what a difference with a year or two of bottle aging!  These are remarkably good wines but you can't really evaluate them when they're just-bottled and first-released.  These showed nice depth and hints of ripe apple, honey and toast (but not oaky).  The texture on the palate was much broader, too.





Montrachet, of which there is precious little!  Lafon has one-third of a hectare of vines in this appellation.  In 2000 they made six barrels.  We are fortunate to be on the allocation list for this rarity.  Delicious and expensive.


  Currently in stock:
We have some recent vintages of Meursault...
Stop by.







DOMAINE LEFLAIVE

The Leflaive name has long been highly-regarded with respect to the wines from Puligny-Montrachet.  Having been privileged to taste these wines over the years, I can say it is in the past decade that the wines have really become a reference point for the appellation and for white Burgundy in general.

Part of the rise in quality may be attributed, perhaps, to the conversion of their vineyards to biodynamic farming practices.  Another contributing factor is due to a modest change in management back in 1990 when Anne-Claude Leflaive took over running the domaine.  Her cousin Olivier runs his own business, the Olivier Leflaive negociant company.

The winemaker is Pierre Morey, whose name appears on his own brand of wines, both home-grown and negociant bottlings.  

The winemaking is straightforward, adding credibility to the notion that "wine is made in the vineyard."  

Leflaive has segmented its vineyard holdings into numerous "blocks" and harvests according to the maturity of the fruit. 


The Leflaive holdings are outside the village of Puligny-Montrachet in various colors.

Once the grapes have come into the cellar, the fruit is pressed and the juice is allowed to settle in stainless steel tanks.  I have heard some winemakers argue against this, claiming it robs the wines of a dimension of character, while other winemakers assert this allows for a "cleaner" fermentation.  You can't argue with the results from Leflaive, however.

The juice is then racked into small French oak barrels and the fermentation is initiated.  They're big fans of stirring the sediment following the fermentation.  The French call this battonage and you can't miss it in the Leflaive wines as they show a really intensely smoky, "leesy" character which is their signature.

Some people may describe the wines of Leflaive as oaky or the product of really toasted oak barrels.   But this isn't the case.  The wines are smoky from their maturation on the spent yeast.  

I've been a fan of the Clavoillon wines, a cru which is just north of Les Pucelles and east of Folatières.  Leflaive owns nearly the entire site, holding 4.79 hectares of the 5.59.  

 

The 2006 Clavoillon is young and delicious, but probably won't really shine for another couple of years.  You can see the wine has some outstanding qualities, however.  We're big fans of this steely dry, smoky, minerally white Burgundy.

The 2007 and 2009 are in stock, as well...both very fine and still a bit young.

Currently in stock:  2006 Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet "Clavoillon" $149.99 (a couple of  bottles in stock)
2004 Leflaive Chevalier-Montrachet  Sold Out
2007 Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet "Clavoillon" SALE $139.99
2009 Leflaive Puligny-Montrachet "Clavoillon" $139.99









 

ETIENNE SAUZET

The name of Etienne Sauzet is
well-known to most fans of 
white Burgundy.

Sauzet was born in the early 1900s
and the domaine comprised about
12 hectares of vines by 1950.

Sauzet passed away in 1975 and
the estate has been run since then
by grand-daughter Jeanine and her
husband, Gerard Boudot.

The domaine comprises approximately 9
hectares today, with the full spectrum of
wines being made.  You can start at basic
Bourgogne and work your way up to 
Montrachet.

Boudot follows in the footsteps of the late founder, keeping the wines in barrel on the spent yeast for 10 to 18 months, depending upon the appellation.  The premier cru and grand cru wines are entirely fermented and aged in small oak barrels.  Boudot seems to prefer about one-third new cooperage for these wines and I understand he'll put wines into stainless steel if he feels they need more aging but not more wood or exposure to oak.

We tasted Boudot's range of 2009s and found them to be really special wines.  Each was very fine and they all tasted "expensive" to me, a rarity with respect to most tastings.  

Sauzet "IS" Puligny-Montrachet.  So's Leflaive, for that matter and both make some terrific wines.  Leflaive's tend to be more smoky and toasty, with a bit more of a lean aspect, while the Sauzet wines have a more opulent quality to them while still retaining their expressive terroir and being complex and showy.

The Champ Canet parcel is approximately one hectare and the vines are close to 50 years of age.
Troncais and Allier barriques are used for the fermentation and aging, with perhaps 40% being new according to Boudot.   The wine may spend close to a year in wood and then it may go into stainless steel for another 6 months or until Monsieur Boudot deems the wine ready for bottling.  The 2009 is fairly full, mildly woodsy with some apple and peach notes in a 'reserved' sort of fashion.  Nicely acidic, too, so this is zesty at this stage and should remain in top form for a few more years...

 

Currently in stock:  2009 ETIENNE SAUZET Puligny-Montrachet "Champ Canet" $119.99


  

DOMAINE PAVELOT (Pernand Vergelesses)

The appellation of Pernand-Vergelesses is one of those relatively 'forgotten' names amongst Burgundy aficionados.  It's a little village of perhaps 300 people tucked away at the northern part of the Cote de Beaune.  

Drive ten minutes north and you're in Vosne-Romanee.  Drive ten minutes south and you're in Pommard, Volnay or maybe Puligny-Montrachet.  All those names are far more famous than Pernand-Vergelesses.  And the most prestigious domaine situated in Pernand doesn't make a wine from vineyards within the AOC of Pernand-Vergelesses, but Corton and Corton-Charlemagne (that would be Bonneau du Martray).

The entire appellation of Pernand-Vergelesses tallies to around 132 hectares, so it's not exactly a large place.

You can easily be confused as to the name Pavelot, for there are two wineries with this name.  One Pavelot is located in Savigny-Les-Beaune and this little domaine of 9 hectares is in beautiful downtown Pernand-Vergelesses.

It's run, these days, by a brother and sister team, Luc and Lise Pavelot.   Both of them graduated from the wine school in nearby Beaune.  Each had good winemaking experiences in doing internships:  he ventured to California and spent some time at Navarro, while Lise headed to the Loire Valley to see how things operated at the Dagueneau winery.

Importer Gary Roshke and his wife Lise Pavelot.
 
Grapes are all hand-harvested into these special harvesting baskets.
 
The vineyards of Pernand-Vergelesses used to be the source of much Aligoté, but in the past few decades most has been replaced by the more financially-rewarding Chardonnay.  Pavelot, however, still cultivates a modest amount of Aligoté.  It's planted, keep in mind, in sites which would be AOC Pernand-Vergelesses were they planted to Chardonnay, so the pedigree of the terroir is particularly good.  
It has been fermented, typically, in stainless steel and then left in stainless until bottling, but with the 2012 vintage, a remarkably tasty wine, this was matured in neutral oak barrels.
While old-time Aligoté was a shrill little white wine, you'll find this to be marvelously stony and crisp with some "there" there.

 

 
We also were delighted by the 2011 Pernand-Vergelesses Blanc.  This comes from a variety of vineyard sites, some facing east and others catching the afternoon sun being west-facing.  There's also a small amount of a parcel which is a Premier Cru site (En Caradeux).   The wine sees about 10% new oak, so it's actually more along the lines of a really serious Chablis than big, white Burgundy.  We like the lemony and stony notes here...a delight with seafood, especially.  
 
 
Showing off the map of some of the Pavelot vineyard sites.



Lise opens a number of bottles to show off the family artistry...

 
 

Currently in stock: 2012 PAVELOT ALIGOTÉ $20.99
2011 PAVELOT PERNAND-VERGELESSES BLANC  $34.99


 



DOMAINE DES GANDINES

The Dananchet (rhymes with Montrachet) family has been cultivating Chardonnay in the Macon region for several generations.  Grandpa Marc had 4 hectares of vines.  His son Robert took the reins of the place and instituted some changes.

For one thing, he discovered one could put the wine in glass bottles and these could be sold to willing consumers.  

In 2005 Robert's son Benjamin came on board and he, too, has some fresh ideas.  Ben liked the idea of cultivating the vineyards in a more environmentally-friendly fashion and today their ten hectare domaine is certified for its "Agriculture Biologique" and they're affiliated with Ecocert.

We applaud their farming responsibly, but we're frankly more concerned if a wine "tastes good" than its "organicity."  The point being, it's great that vintners "do the right thing" in the vineyard, but if the wine is dirty, oxidized, spoiled or simply weird, we're not interested.  

(( As a side note, we attended a tasting of 'organically' farmed wines and found some really strange bottles...the most odd was a wine which tasted like the liquid in a container of Kosher Dill Pickles...!!!))

We tasted their Mâcon Péronne which comes from vineyards a few kilometers north of the winery.  The vineyards were planted in the late 1950s.   The soils are chalky/clay and they've got 2.5 hectares in Péronne.  The fruit is hand-harvested and they whole-cluster press the grapes, fermenting using indigenous yeasts.  The wine does go into large wooden tanks where it's left on the yeast sediment for 6 to 10 months.  

The wine tastes like Chardonnay, for one thing.  It's not the "fruit cocktail" which so many California winemakers produce.  It's dry and elegant, with aromas of ripe apple and a hint of citrus.  There's a mild minerality to the wine, as well.  And it's well-priced...

Currently in stock:  2013 DOMAINE DES GANDINES MACON-PÉRONNE  $13.99




 


CHATEAU DE CHASSAGNE-MONTRACHET

 
The Bader-Mimeur family own most of the property known as the Chateau de Chassagne-Montrachet with another vintner owning about 2% of the vines.   The family can trace its Burgundian roots back to the early 1900s and one of the old-timers had a little wine shop in Paris which is still in operation as an outlet for the winery.

Alain Fossier married into the family and he's viewed as the engine that runs this place these days.

One of our top importers was visiting Burgundy recently and tasted the range of wines they're making...he came away fairly impressed and brought some wines to taste.  A nice little Bourgogne Rouge was very good...and their 2010 Chassagne-Montrachet with the "Chateau de Chassagne-Montrachet" label is very handsome!

The 2010 vintage of Chassagne-Montrachet comes from vines averaging about 35 years of age.  The wine is matured in small oak cooperage, with 20% of the barrels being new.  This makes for a nicely balanced wine...you can sense the wood in the glass, but it's not the centerpiece of the wine.
Dry...medium-bodied.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Currently in stock:  2010 BADER-MIMEUR "CHATEAU DE CHASSAGNE-MONTRACHET"  Chassagne Montrachet  $49.99

 








MANCIAT-PONCET



Claude Manciat and his wife Simone Poncet have been growing grapes for decades, but they only began bottling their own wines in 1979.





They have about 4.5 hectares of vineyards in the Pouilly-Fuissé appellation and another five in Macon. While most of the vineyards in Macon are machine-harvested, Manciat-Poncet vineyards are still picked by hand.   

Though they both qualify for the senior citizen's discount at the local cinema, both Claude and Simone are vivacious and still enthusiastic about their work. 

We tasted a variety of tank and barrel samples on our visit a few years ago.  Claude buys oak, for example, from several different coopers and the wines aged in each has a slightly different "seasoning" as a result.  To complicate matters, slightly, Manciat-Poncet works with one importer whose preference is for lavishly-oaked wines and another whose preference is more for wines which have no oak or merely a hint of wood.  The importer we purchase from prefers the wines which taste more of the grape than of the lumber.












The Pouilly-Fuissé we have is the "Les Crays" bottling, a wine which shows just a bit of wood.  One part of the wine is exposed to a percentage of new barrels, while most is matured in seasoned, more neutral oak.  Large negociant firms such as Louis Jadot bottle a small lake's worth of Pouilly-Fuissé which is rather bland, simple white wine of little character.  (And I'm being polite.)

Manciat-Poncet's wine actually has quite a bit of Chardonnay character and a hint of wood.  

 
 
Their Macon-Charnay (Charnay is a village whose wines can be sold either as Macon-Villages or Macon-Charnay) is a delicious, light, uncomplicated white wine.  It still has character, though, even though wood is not part of the equation.  The 2011 comes from a good vintage and the fruit in this wine is reminiscent of the fragrance we get from a bucket of fresh-picked apples from our friend's place in Woodside.  Delightful! It's an uncomplicated, yet delicious, wine.  



 
 
They make a bit of Pinot Noir and Gamay.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Simone organized a lovely lunch for us.  


Crudités and Macon-Charnay.
This is a lovely combination!


Asparagus, Haricots Verts and Jerusalem Artichokes along with
some Pike Quenelles made for one nice lunch!

CURRENTLY IN STOCK:  2011 POUILLY-FUISSÉ SALE $25.99
2011 MACON-CHARNAY  $14.99



A. et P. DE VILLAINE

Bouzeron isn't exactly the center of the universe when it comes to Burgundy.

It's a small appellation (and a new one, at that) which is devoted to the white grape, Aligoté.  When wine connoisseurs visit Burgundy, Bouzeron  is almost certainly on the itinerary.  Visiting there would be a bit like heading to a fancy car dealer and taking a spin on a scooter, instead of test-driving a Bentley.

The Bouzeron appellation was created in 1998 and today it comprises about 52 hectares of vineyards and there are perhaps a dozen vintners who offer wine of this designation from La Côte Chalonnaise.

The most famous is this domaine, which is run by the main man of the Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, Aubert de Villaine.  He's the "A", while his wife Pamela is the "P."  She's the first cousin, by the way, of Carneros (Napa) grower, Larry Hyde.  They have a modest estate in Bouzeron, with about half the production devoted to this looked-down-upon grape.

Aligoté, however, was, once-upon-a-time, more highly regarded and even cultivated in such esteemed appellations as Pernand-Vergelesses and Meursault.  There still may be scattered plantings in those towns and in other places around Burgundy, but it's typically cultivated in places where you wouldn't bother with the more noble Chardonnay or Pinot Noir.  
In Bouzeron, however, it's a different story:  Aligoté is cultivated exclusively on slopes and not on flat land.  Not surprisingly, what is often a meager, skinny, runt-of-a-wine in other areas, produces a somewhat more interesting white wine in Bouzeron.

I don't want you to think this is a wine of the complexity of a major league White Burgundy.  It is not.

It is, though, a very enjoyable, stony, minerally, bone dry white wine which may strike you as being sort of like a crisp Sancerre with the minerality of a good Chablis.  It's a good partner for shellfish starters as it will provide a lovely contrast with a more complex and opulent wine with the main course.

Currently in stock:  2012 DE VILLAINE "BOUZERON"  $26.99

 







LAMBLIN
This family traces its history in Chablis back to the year 1690.  Three hundred and fifteen years later, we finally bought some wine from them.  I'm sure they're hoisting a glass of bubbly to celebrate.

We've tasted various vintages of the Lamblin's simple "Bourgogne Blanc" and typically found the wine to be well-made, crisp, nodding in the direction of Chablis.   The 2005-2011 bottlings were very good and now the 2012 vintage is here...quite nice!  And it's selling for but eleven bucks!  There's a touch of the minerally, lime-like, appley, mildly mushroomy note...sort of Chablis-Meets-Vouvray (except no sugar).  It tastes like it comes from Chablis or near Chablis and is a good example of non-oaked Chardonnay.  

We like this paired with steamed clams, pâté, cold chicken and other light fare.  The Lamblin's suggest serving this with cream-sauced fish.   Your mileage may vary.

Currently in stock:  2012 LAMBLIN "Bourgogne - Chardonnay"  SALE $12.50
 




 

GERALD & PHILIBERT TALMARD

This is a father and son team located in the village of Uchizy in Macon.  They actually have holdings in a couple of places and produce attractively-priced, crisp, snappy Chardonnays.  

They make two wines, one from Uchizy and the other from the town of Chardonnay (yes, the grape is Chardonnay and the town is called Chardonnay!).  

We stock the Macon-Chardonnay and this has been a frequent offering here in the shop since the 1980s!

The wine is not exposed to wood and it's a simple, crisp, bright dry white wine.  You won't confuse this with Montrachet, but then, you can buy cases and cases of Talmard Macon for the price of a single bottle of Montrachet.

Currently in stock:  2012 TALMARD MACON-CHARDONNAY  $10.99


Nothing fancy in the cellar...just typical, easy-to-clean stainless steel tanks, some bottling and labeling equipment, a few wine glasses and, voila!


 

More White Burgundies
 

winepour.gif (12696 bytes)Wine Tasting Today

TO INQUIRE ABOUT A WINE:  
Copyright © 1999 WEIMAX October 20,  2014